Case Study #3 – Absolute Privacy

Like all reputable paranormal investigative groups, we have a form that we ask all of our clients to fill out and sign. It’s our “Client Privacy Agreement”. There are three choices for the client to select from, initial, and sign. The first choice essentially says, SURE! Release all the evidence you find along with my name, address, phone number, date of birth, SSN, and favorite KISS band member.

OK. I exaggerate. But, you get the idea.

The second choice says, Yes, you may release any evidence you find but you cannot divulge any of my personal information. As you can imagine, this is the selection all of our clients choose. All but one of our clients.

The third choice states, No, you may absolutely not release anything. No personal information, no evidence, no nothing.

This case study is about that third choice, the choice that forces us to keep the evidence to ourselves, on our hard drives, never to see the light of day, so to speak.

What I can tell you about this client and his case is that it was all very personal. Recent grief personal, and it was that grief that led him to initial that third choice. As investigators, we are always happy to help a client, but we also like to share our findings with the world, proof that A-ha! Told you! There ARE such things as ghosts! But with cases such as this one, we can’t do that. We have to hold our cards close to our chests and not reveal any of the things we may, or may not, have found.

Our client’s well-being is first on our list of investigation priorities. Answering our own lingering questions? Sure, that’s important to each individual investigator. Making sure the equipment works? Yep, that’s there, too. Getting answers for the client? That’s pretty important, but not as important as following the wishes of our client.

Too many people have had bad experiences with paranormal investigative teams. Teams who allow non-investigators to pay money to “ghost hunt” in someone’s private home. Teams who are simply thrill-seekers who are just there to catch ghosts and not help. There are teams who never present final reports and there are teams whose only purpose is to provoke, stir-up, and then run away while the client is left to deal with the mess. We don’t do that. I remember one case in particular where the husband didn’t want us there but had grudgingly agreed to the wife that we could investigate if we would leave as soon as he returned home. Let’s just say that when we heard the garage door open, we were like a bunch of cockroaches scattering in the light. I think our gear was torn down and put away in under ten minutes.

If a client asks us to be out of their house by midnight, then we’re packed up ten minutes before. If our client asks us to not use a certain piece of equipment, then that bit of technology stays in our equipment case. If our client asks us to keep everything under wraps, then that’s what we do.

And that’s what this post is about. This post is about that one client, and any future clients, who want to keep a very personal case just that – personal. As much as we want to share our findings to the world if you, our client, make that third choice on our privacy agreement, then your evidence will go no further than our report to you.

Agreed?

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About Heather S. Dobson

I wish I was Wonder Woman, but I'm actually a wife, mother of three young ones, a writer, a paranormal investigator, and a lunatic. I'm also hoping to win a Nobel Prize in physics, but I guess that means I should get something above a BS in said subject and do more in-depth, life-changing studies besides "the sticking power of mac 'n cheese on smooth wallpaper." Alas...
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